An Assessment of the Failure of the Durban Summit on the Climat

By Esther Vivas and Josep maria Antentas

We will save the markets, not the climate. That is how we can summarize the outcome of the 17th Conference of Parties (COP17) to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCC) which took place in Durban, South Africa between 28 November and 10 December 2011. There is a striking contrast between the rapid response by governments and international institutions at the onset of the economic and financial crisis of 2007-08 in bailing out private banks with public money and the complete immobility they demonstrate in response to climate change. Yet this should not surprise us, because in both cases it is the markets and their accomplices in government who come out as winners. Continue reading “An Assessment of the Failure of the Durban Summit on the Climat”

Going Deeper On What Happened In Durban: An Ethical Critique of Durban Outcomes

By DONALD A. BROWN

I. Introduction: What Is Missing In Reporting About The Durban Outcome?

It has now been two weeks since negotiations at the 17th Conference of the Parties (COP-17) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) were completed in the early morning of Sunday, December 11, 2011 in Durban, South Africa. We will claim that there is something missing from the reporting of what happened in Durban that is crucial if one aspires to think critically about the Durban outcomes. That is, reporting on Durban has for the most part missed the biggest story, namely that most nations continue to act as if they have no obligations to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to their fair share of safe global emission, that the positions they have been taking on most major climate issues fail any reasonable minimum ethical test, that an acknowledgement that nations not only have interests but duties and responsibilities continues to be the key missing element in the negotiations, and that some nations in particular have lamentably not only failed to lead on climate change but are continuing to take positions that not only fail to satisfy their immediate international duties to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions but also encourage irresponsible behavior of other nations. Continue reading “Going Deeper On What Happened In Durban: An Ethical Critique of Durban Outcomes”

The Durban Package: escape hatches, empty shells, and a death notice to equity

IBON assessment of the Durban climate change summit

 The next ten years could decide whether the world’s fight against climate change is lost or won. The Durban Package – the set of decisions agreed to in the summit – amounts to more heavy lifting for the South, less obligations for the North, and little help for the poor. Worse still, it means that the present decade will be a decade of zero progress in curbing global emissions, and one where equity as the basis of the global climate effort will have been abandoned. Continue reading “The Durban Package: escape hatches, empty shells, and a death notice to equity”

Durban’s climate Zombie tripped by dying carbon markets

By Patrick Bond

Looking back now that the dust has settled, South Africa’s COP17 presidency appears disastrous. This was confirmed not only by Durban’s delayed, diplomatically-decrepit denouement, but by plummeting carbon markets in the days immediately following the conference’s ignoble end last Sunday. Continue reading “Durban’s climate Zombie tripped by dying carbon markets”

The Durban Package: “Laisser faire, laisser passer”

By Pablo Solon

(December 14, 2011) The Climate Change Conference ended two days later than expected, adopting a set of decisions that were known only a few hours before their adoption. Some decisions were even not complete at the moment of their consideration. Paragraphs were missing and some delegations didn’t even have copies of these drafts. The package of decisions was released by the South African presidency with the ultimatum of “Take it or leave it”. Only the European Union was allowed to make last minute amendments at the plenary. Continue reading “The Durban Package: “Laisser faire, laisser passer””

Climate: Disastrous “Durban Package” Accelerates Onset of Climate Catastrophe

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA, 13 DECEMBER 2011 – The UN climate talks in Durban were a failure and take the world a significant step back by further undermining an already flawed, inadequate multilateral system that is supposed to address the climate crisis, according to Friends of the Earth International. Continue reading “Climate: Disastrous “Durban Package” Accelerates Onset of Climate Catastrophe”

Climate finance should not add to the external debt burdens of poor recipient countries, says UN expert

A news release issued by the United Nations Human Rights, Office of the High Commissioner.

GENEVA (8 December 2011) – The United Nations Independent Expert on foreign debt and human rights, Cephas Lumina, urged the international climate change gatherings currently underway in Durban, South Africa, to ensure that finance under the proposed Green Climate Fund does not exacerbate the external debt burdens of recipient countries. Continue reading “Climate finance should not add to the external debt burdens of poor recipient countries, says UN expert”

Mic Check: Protesters take up camp inside COP17 conference centre

by Tim McSorley, Published in The Media Coop

At 15h00 local time in Durban, SA (8am EST), dozens of protesters gathered inside the International Conference Centre where the COP17 negotiations are entering their final hours. Continue reading “Mic Check: Protesters take up camp inside COP17 conference centre”

Green Climate Fund: FOR PEOPLE OR POLLUTERS?

The GREEN CLIMATE FUND should serve the needs of the peoples of developing countries. But Parties of developed countries are doing their utmost to ensure that the Fund operate based solely on their terms. Continue reading “Green Climate Fund: FOR PEOPLE OR POLLUTERS?”

Ministers to address difficult issues

Durban, 8 Dec (Meena Raman) – With less than two days left for the conclusion of the Durban climate talks, Parties are still far apart on many critical issues that remain unresolved at the level of negotiators. These issues are now expected to be addressed by Ministers. Continue reading “Ministers to address difficult issues”